TRAVEL GUIDE
 
 
 
 
Cost
 
Accommodation and food are both very economical in Tibet. The major expense – unless you have plenty of time and enjoy rough travelling – is getting around. If you really want to see a lot in a short space of time, you will probably have to consider hiring a vehicle and driver. Shared hired transport tends to work out at around US$30 per person per day. The per-person cost for a group of six travelling with stops from Lhasa to the Nepali border is around US$200.
Getting into Tibet is also relatively expensive. Train packages from Xining start at around US$170 (including permits), while the cheapest package by air costs around US$245 from Chengdu.
 
If you don’t hire transport (and it is still perfectly possible to see most of the places covered in this guide if you don’t), costs are very reasonable. If you are staying in Lhasa and visiting the surrounding sights you can do it comfortably on US$20 per day, staying in a dorm room or sharing a double. Outside the cities, daily costs drop drastically, especially if you’re hitching or hiking out to remote monasteries. Keep in mind that entry tickets can really add up: visit Lhasa’s main sights and you’ll end up shelling out around US$60 in entry fees.
 
At the other end of the scale there’s a lot more scope to go top end these days, at least in the cities. New five-star hotels, paved roads and a luxury train look set to take out much of the rigour of a visit to the Roof of the World.
 
 
 
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