TRAVEL GUIDE
 
 
 
 
Getting around
 
Tibet’s transport infrastructure is poorly developed and, with the exception of the Friendship Hwy and the Qinghai–Tibet Hwy, most of the roads are in rough condition. Work is being undertaken to improve this situation – a vital aspect of Chinese plans to develop Tibet – but it is unlikely that travel in large parts of Tibet will become comfortable or easy in the near future.
The main problem for travellers short on time is the scarcity of public transport. There are no internal flights (except to Chamdo, a closed area) and only a handful of buses and minibuses plying the roads between Lhasa and other major Tibetan towns such as Shigatse and Tsetang.
 
Most travellers band together to hire a Land Cruiser to get around Tibet but this isn’t absolutely necessary. Minibuses run to most monasteries around Lhasa, and to Shigatse, Gyantse, Sakya and Lhatse. Hitching is another possibility; you will still have to pay, but only a fraction of the amount for a Land Cruiser. You’ll need to be more self-sufficient and prepared to wait perhaps for hours for a ride. Hitching in Tibet can be the best way to get around but it can also be very frustrating, and there are risks.
Those with more time can, of course, trek or cycle their way around the high plateau. A combination of hiking and hitching is the best way to get to many off-the-beaten-track destinations.
 
 
 
  All Rights Reserved © 2014. MALLA HIMALAYAN ADVENTURE a CIRCLE WEB DESINGS CREATION